Issue 4: Fall 2015 (Foodways)

I. From Around the World: Pickled Okra | Teresa Velten

Discover my favorite Southern pickle as you never have before and learn how I found it was closer to my European home than I thought.

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II. One Place Remembers Another | Trista Reis Porter

Staring down these rows of North Carolina corn, I fill the spaces with glimpses of collective celebrations and histories, diverse landscapes and geographical patterns, and memories that reveal the identity of an Iowan in North Carolina.

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III.  Mr. Peanut: Virginia’s Agricultural Aristocrat | Rachel C. Kirby

This parade was not for them. This parade was for an anthropomorphized peanut. It was for Mr. Peanut, a paradoxical combination of southern agriculture and Virginia aristocracy.

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IV. Southern Maps | Michaela Dwyer

We use them up, as we use the landscape, as we use the food we eat and the wrapping that eats it. The question, then: What remains?

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V. The Kosher Texas Hamburger | Solomon Weiner

When is a hamburger more than a hamburger? When it mediates multiple identities, disparate places, and plays a leading role in making sense of what it means to be Jewish, Texan, Chicano, and Southern.

VI. A Foreign Southern Concept | Justin Freeman

The Mona Lisa of southern appetizers graced our plates, the shrimp prosciutto.

VII. Spit Can Roulette | Taylor E. Hayes

This was the morning gamble, and the wager was my tastebuds.

VIII. A Lesson in Honeysuckle | Scott Geier

You can find some interesting things at the edge of the woods. Like a memory from your childhood.

IX. A Gingham Apron | Sophie Wu

A gingham apron, made by a mother for her daughter, symbolizes the warp and weft of two women’s lives and tells a story about Southern womanhood.

X. Pound Cake | Christen Nuzum

A tried and true pound cake recipe is an heirloom, a physical manifestation of cherished memories and generational ties. Specifically, a Sun-Drop pound cake recipe is an heirloom in my family.

XI. Teacakes & Fried Bologna | Kimber Thomas

If blackness and southernness had a love child, it would be a teacake.

XII. Grandma Judy’s Fried Chicken | Emily Ridder-Beardsley

Friday night magic and ‘Chick-Chick for Baby’.

XIII. Sweet Iced Tea | Amanda Liggin

As elements of Southern cuisine have spread North, Southern values have become increasingly important in presidential and congressional elections.

XIV. “I Don’t Want No Peanut Butter and Jelly” | Mary D. Williams

“I don’t want no peanut butter and jelly; I want my soul to be saved.”


Issue 4 (Foodways) was completed by undergraduate and graduate students in  AMST 489: “Writing Material Culture,” under the direction of editor-in-chief Bernard L. Herman in fall 2015. Students chose southern things related to Foodways in connection with the 2015-2017 university-wide academic theme, “Food for All: Local & Global Perspectives.”

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