Bricks

From the eighteenth-century single-room "mansions" of Delaware's Cypress Swamp district to the early twentieth-century suburban housing around Philadelphia and Wilmington, the architectural landscape of the mid-Atlantic region is both rich and varied. In this pioneering field guide to the region's historic vernacular architecture, Gabrielle Lanier and Bernard Herman describe the remarkably diverse building traditions that have overlapped and influenced one another for generations.
From the eighteenth-century single-room “mansions” of Delaware’s Cypress Swamp district to the early twentieth-century suburban housing around Philadelphia and Wilmington, the architectural landscape of the mid-Atlantic region is both rich and varied. In this pioneering field guide to the region’s historic vernacular architecture, Gabrielle Lanier and Bernard Herman describe the remarkably diverse building traditions that have overlapped and influenced one another for generations.

“Because of the numerous processing required in manufacture, brick was a highly transformed material, perhaps the most “artificial” of all building materials available to many builders. Bricks vary slightly in size, but most average around 8¼ inches on the long face, 4¼ inches on the short end, and 2¼ inches high; they are designed to be small enough to be handled by one person.” [1]

[1] Gabrielle M. Lanier and Bernard L. Herman. Everyday Architecture of the Mid-Atlantic : Looking at Buildings and Landscapes. (Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997), 99.